Five Ways to Think of A Fantastic Domain Name That's Still in use
Domains

Five Ways to Think of A Fantastic Domain Name That’s Still in use

I’d be a millionaire in the event that I could earn a dollar every time someone complained that all the fantastic domains have already been taken. It’s not true however. In an industry that is highly competitive you can come up with distinctive, appealing domain names for your business employing naming strategies that very rarely are used for example:

1. Be focused on the outcomes. What is the desired outcome that customers want to achieve from purchasing an item or service? What are their feelings after they’ve completed the purchase? My company’s name, named Named At Last fits into this category.

2. Find puns. Make a list with relevant keywords. Say each out loud and experiment with the sound. Puns are less likely than other names to be registered as their constituent parts are not actually words. For example, the name Sitesfaction which refers to an online design firm, was one of the finalists in our initial contest for naming – and also a domain that was available at the time, despite the tens of thousand web-design companies within the English-speaking world.

3. Consider slang. Use your imagination and memories to move around to find pleasing-to-the-ear words. Today this website BoyOhBoyToys.com to host an online store for toys has not been registered. The same is true for the domain used by the sister site AttaGirlToys.com.

4. Make it symbolic. If you’re an expert in the horror genre and would like to establish a paid-for online community for fans of horror. Horrorific.com, horrorgate.com and Horrornet.com are all available, however at present the less well-known and more vibrant FrightOwl.com isn’t.

5. Real words can be a bit different. “Google’s title is actually a reference to the word googol which is a reference to the number one followed by one hundred zeroes” states the Press Center of the world’s most popular search engine. “The term was invented by the nephew of nine years old the mathematician Edward Kasner,” it continues , offering a further hint to come up with a unique name: ask the child.

Happy Naming!